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Bradley Manning deserves to be set free

Finally, the trial of the century made the front page of The Sun ("Accused WikiLeaker to ask for dismissal," Nov. 26). I will join others outside the main gate to Fort Meade to show support for the whistleblower Pfc. Bradley Manning during his latest hearing.

Some generations ago, Daniel Ellsberg took the risks of peace and released the Pentagon Papers. The papers revealed how the U.S. government consistently lied about the imperial war in Vietnam. For that remarkable action, Mr. Ellsberg faced the full wrath of the Nixon administration, which was one of the most crooked of all time. Today, Mr. Ellsberg is recognized as a national hero, and he happens to be one of Private Manning's biggest boosters.

Like Mr. Ellsberg, Mr. Manning has a conscience. He became aware of U.S. government malfeasance, U.S. support for dictators and U.S. war crimes. His conscience made him a heroic whistle-blower with supporters around the world. Sadly, the Obama administration, like the Nixon administration, is persecuting the whistle-blower. It is stunning to realize that someone decided to torture Mr. Manning while he was imprisoned at Quantico.

Of course, Mr. Manning will be court-martialed. It's unlikely the judge or the prosecution team would have the courage to dismiss the charges and release the defendant. So we supporters must do what we can to some day get Bradley Manning his freedom.

Max Obuszewski, Baltimore

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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