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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Lacrosse and good character

Letter writer Kyle Lagratta's response ("Lacrosse a victim of stereotyping," Feb. 29) to Susan Reimer's column regarding the "unfounded argument" against the sport of lacrosse prompts me to respond.

Our youngest son played organized lacrosse for several years before entering college. He was extremely fortunate to benefit from the guidance by an outstanding coach at a Division III school in the Northeast. We witnessed our son mature into a well-rounded adult by the time of his graduation due to the influence of a coach who emphasized leadership and teamwork.

There is a direct correlation between our son's lacrosse experience and his laudable career as an officer with theU.S. Marine Corps. Upon serving two tours in Iraq and other assignments, he returned to the civilian world and is presently with a multinational corporation. In great part, his success is due to a great coach and the rigorous demands of the game of lacrosse.

James E. Le Gette, Severna Park

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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