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News Opinion Readers Respond

High taxes and fees won't end until voters act

Sen. Nancy Jacobs' commentary was right on the mark ("Marylanders' wallets run on empty," July 2). Gov. Martin O'Malley and the many state senators and delegates in the Maryland General Assembly who voted for higher gasoline taxes, tolls and fees have placed a further burden on Maryland's working families, businesses and retirees.

One of their purported goals for this ill-gotten increased revenue is the construction of more expensive light rail systems that we cannot afford and which will not pay for themselves. Now, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, a key member of the O'Malley administration, is running for governor. If he is elected, we can look forward to more uncontrolled tax-and-spend policies patterned on those of his mentor. If Maryland taxpayers, including working families, businesses and retirees are ever to be free from this repressive, destructive and endless cycle of tax-and-spend government, we must vote out of office every elected official (regardless of party) who has supported, promulgated and voted for the higher taxes, tolls and fees.

This must include Mr. Brown, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Speaker of the House Michael E. Busch, and every senator and delegate in the General Assembly who voted for the higher taxes, and increased tolls and fees. They are not going to cease their cycle of tax-and-spend until we voters intervene decisively. To paraphrase the ancient fable of "The Scorpion and the Frog," it's their nature.

Richard Shannahan, Lutherville

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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