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Biased news coverage of Israel [Letter]

The Sun recently published extensive, highly negative but unchallenged remarks about Israel made by Richard Falk, who is identified in the story as an unbiased UN human rights investigator monitoring Israel's treatment of Palestinians ("U.N. investigator accuses Israel of 'ethnic cleansing,'" March 22).

Yet nowhere are Mr. Falk's deep-seated anti-Israel and anti-Western biases noted in the more than 750-word article.

Among its many omissions, the article failed to mention that Mr. Falk was chastised by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for saying the U.S. has covered up its own involvement in the 9/11 attack and that the Boston Marathon bombing was understandable "blowback" for American policies in the Muslim world. He was also forced to apologize for posting an anti-Semitic cartoon on his Web site after critics called him out on it.

Mr. Falk was asked to resign from the board of Human Rights Watch because of his inflammatory rhetoric. He openly supports a one-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, meaning he is on record as favoring an end to an independent Israel.

And while he holds the title of UN Special Rapporteur on human rights in the Palestinian territories, he ignores the violations that Hamas and the Palestinian Authority commit against their fellow-Palestinians and instead comments only on those he can attribute to Israel.

A conflict as tangled and important to Americans and the world as is the Israeli-Palestinian struggle demands better coverage.

Ira Rifkin, Annapolis

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Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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