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Foreign policy failure in Iraq

Regarding Ian Livingston and Michael O'Hanlon's recent commentary on Iraq, I think it's important to provide readers with some additional background information ("In bloody Iraq, not all hope is lost," Oct. 13).

First, the authors stated that the combat troops associated with the war effort had left Iraq, when in fact they didn't just leave. Instead, they were withdrawn and sent home at the end of 2011 by President Barack Obama in an obvious political ploy to enhance his chances of being reelected in 2012.

In my opinion, this is the greatest mistake President Obama ever made in his foreign relations. It sadly ended the efforts of the U.S. to assist Iraq in becoming the first democratic nation in the Middle East.

Instead, Iraq was quickly engulfed in civil strife, with constant bombings and battles between Shiites, Sunnis and other sects.

Quinton D. Thompson, Towson

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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