Summer Savings! Get unlimited digital access for 13 weeks for $13.

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Foreign policy failure in Iraq

Regarding Ian Livingston and Michael O'Hanlon's recent commentary on Iraq, I think it's important to provide readers with some additional background information ("In bloody Iraq, not all hope is lost," Oct. 13).

First, the authors stated that the combat troops associated with the war effort had left Iraq, when in fact they didn't just leave. Instead, they were withdrawn and sent home at the end of 2011 by President Barack Obama in an obvious political ploy to enhance his chances of being reelected in 2012.

In my opinion, this is the greatest mistake President Obama ever made in his foreign relations. It sadly ended the efforts of the U.S. to assist Iraq in becoming the first democratic nation in the Middle East.

Instead, Iraq was quickly engulfed in civil strife, with constant bombings and battles between Shiites, Sunnis and other sects.

Quinton D. Thompson, Towson

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • ISIS should be described as murderers, not militants

    ISIS should be described as murderers, not militants

    The Sun's report on the burning to death of the captured Jordanian pilot refers to his murderers as "militants" ("After Jordanian's death, U.S. moves pilot rescue aircraft closer to battlefield," Feb. 5). The juxtaposition of the barbarity of the murderers coupled with the anodyne description of...

  • Obama's window dressing in Iraq

    Obama's window dressing in Iraq

    President Barack Obama's announcement last week that he will send an additional 450 U.S. troops to Iraq to train and assist the Iraqi Army in its battle against the self-proclaimed Islamic State appears to be a futile gesture. The chances that a few hundred more American advisers can turn the situation...

  • Obama's incompetent foreign policy

    Obama's incompetent foreign policy

    "Alarmed about the growing threat from Islamic State, the Obama administration has dramatically stepped up warnings of potential terrorist attacks on American soil…."

  • In Iraq, a de facto U.S.-Iran alliance

    In Iraq, a de facto U.S.-Iran alliance

    In principle, the Obama administration's strategy for confronting the Islamic State made perfect sense: The U.S. would conduct military airstrikes against insurgent strongholds in Syria and Iraq in support of coordinated attacks on the ground by troops fielded by our regional allies. The goal was...

  • Iraqis give away U.S. weapons

    Iraqis give away U.S. weapons

    Observing the Iraqi forces fighting ISIS running away every time they engage ISIS is one thing, but it is entirely another thing for the Iraqis to abandon their American weapons every time they retreat in a panic ("Islamic State seizes part of ancient town of Palmyra in Syria," May 20).

  • Why must media use the term ISIS?

    Why must media use the term ISIS?

    I was elated to see the article, "U.S.: Airstrikes in Syria, Iraq change Islamic State tactics" (Oct. 18), use the same terminology as President Barack Obama when referring to the Islamic State that we are currently combating. I wish I could say the same for the media. Prominent anchors and pundits...

  • Obama's costly foreign policy failures

    Obama's costly foreign policy failures

    Peter Morici produced a fine piece of writing and logic ("The poverty of Obama's foreign policy," May 20). But he should give some credit to President Barack Obama's self-proclaimed "successes" in Iraq, Yemen and Libya.

  • Could ISIS pull off another 9/11?

    Could ISIS pull off another 9/11?

    I remember 9/11 as if it were yesterday, when the U.S. was struck in New York and Washington by well-laid plans hatched in Afghanistan.

Comments
Loading

84°