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What will it take before President Obama stands up to the mullahs in Tehran?

IranBarack ObamaJimmy CarterRonald Reagan

The muted communication from a spokesperson for the Navy's Fifth Fleet that it won't tolerate an Iranian attempt to close to Strait of Hormuz and shut off much of the world's oil supply is not an adequate response to the threat. It comes off as another sign of an apathetic, apologetic U.S. foreign policy ("Iran warns U.S. over Strait of Hormuz," Dec. 29).

Why does it always seem that President Obama is out of town when we need him? We see him getting ice cream with his family, which is very touching. However, there is a world going on out there.

Meanwhile, the U.S. continues to lose face as well as the trust of its allies. We need to be a major player in the Gulf Region for both economic and national security reasons.

The president has already let down our best ally, Israel. Iraq, too, seems to be heading down the tubes. Yet, Mr. Obama's extreme passivity only emboldens our enemies and postpones the inevitable.

He should take a lesson from history. When Ronald Reagan replaced a similarly weak president, Jimmy Carter, the American hostages held by Iran were immediately released. The Reagan doctrine of "peace through strength" was and should always be the model we follow.

Throughout his presidency, Reagan stood up to our enemies. He addressed them directly, not through intermediaries or some other form of indirect communication. He put his face on his foreign policy, and it brought major, positive change to the world.

We know President Obama can take his case to the American people because we see him do it for political reasons all the time. Yet here we are on the brink of war with Iran over its nuclear weapons program; now is the time for our president to show some backbone.

Richard LaCourse, Forest Hill

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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IranBarack ObamaJimmy CarterRonald Reagan
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