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Rowhani's charm offensive

Portraying Iranian President Hasan Rowhani as a man of peace is a farce given his record of duplicity and his long association with Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei ("Having faith in peace," Oct. 1).

Unfortunately, Mr. Rowhani's charm offensive apparently has been working, as witnessed by the eagerness of President Obama to engage in negotiations with the Iranian government.

The Iranian delegation by a master stroke of diplomacy has been able to continue its nuclear bomb program under the guise of agreeing to negotiate with the U.S. What will be the result of the detente between Iran and the U.S. that the administration has been seeking?

All the outcomes are destined to be negative. First, with an acceleration of Iran's nuclear bomb and missile programs while meaningless negotiations are conducted. Second, with the possible lifting of some sanctions, just when they have begun to bite. And finally, most importantly, we have foreclosed the military option against Iran, not only for us but for Israel as well by giving that nation a red light against any military action against Iran's nuclear program.

Iran is the clear winner. The loser is Israel, which now has no hope that a strike against Iran's nuclear program will be supported by a U.S. that is engaged in fruitless and endless negotiations with Iran.

Nelson Marans, Silver Spring

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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