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Maryland should not penalize Iran shippers

In his recent commentary, Jay Bernstein wants the Maryland authorities to maintain a restrictive policy warning shippers that "if you trade with Iran, you can't trade here" ("Keep up the pressure on Iran," June 21). But the principles of free trade and the rules of the World Trade Organization are very clear: Shippers who conduct perfectly legitimate trade with Iran, some of whom supply humanitarian supplies of food and medicine, cannot be penalized and told they can't do business in Maryland or any other U.S state.

This is why U.S authorities have been reluctant to enforce sanctions because they can easily be legally challenged, and companies can sue for loss of business — sanctioned Iranian banks have already been successful at this.

Yousef Bozorgmehr, Wilmington, Del.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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