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Obama goes soft on Iran — again

After listening to speeches during the opening session of the United Nations General Assembly, I concluded that both U.S. President Barack Obama and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad do not take each other seriously.

Mr. Obama repeated his old empty messages and declared again, "Make no mistake: A nuclear-armed Iran is not a challenge that can be contained." The Iranian apocalyptic leader who has never engaged in serious discussions also declared again to the world his wishes to see the elimination of the state of Israel.

The fact that negotiations, sanctions and diplomatic efforts lead by the Obama administration did not slow or stop Iran's ambitious plan to build a nuclear weapon proves that Iran's radical leader doesn't even consider taking Mr. Obama's messages seriously. Iran continues to spin centrifuges, support the Syrian criminal Bashar al-Assad, the terror organization Hamas in Gaza, and Hezbollah in Lebanon also, promote terrorism around the world. Mr. Ahmadinejad believes that Allah has raised him up to "wipe Israel off the map" and raised him up to help Iran bring back the twelfth Imam who will help Islam rule the world. This belief is much more meaningful to him and the Iranian supreme leaders than Mr. Obama's statements.

After years of failed diplomatic process to get Iran to cooperate, President Obama had another chance on the U.N. podium to deliver a stronger message and let this dangerous regime know that they have crossed all red lines, but he didn't. He didn't because Mr. Obama doesn't take Mr. Ahmadinejad's intentions, statements and actions seriously.

Ziva Giliya, Timonium

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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