Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Iran is serious about nuclear talks; it's the U.S. that has stymied progress on the issue

The report onIran'srefusal to negotiate about its nuclear program is misleading ("Iran defiant in response to EU's boycott of its oil," Jan. 24). Iran's "unwillingness to negotiate" is belied by the fact that Iran negotiated with the U.S. long before the implementation of sanctions ostensibly designed to force it back to the bargaining table.

In the first and only American attempt to negotiate with Iran on this issue, the U.S. accepted an agreement between Iran and third-party countries that would have allowed Iran to transfer 1,200 kilograms of low- enriched uranium in exchange for fuel rods enriched to 20 percent for the production of medical isotopes. But the Obama administration walked away from this agreement when Iran wanted a guarantee that it would receive the fuel rods.

The U.S. is the party unwilling to negotiate in good faith without preconditions. Iran under the Nuclear Proliferation Treaty has a right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes, and its willingness to concede that right in negotiations with the U.S. demonstrated a seriousness that the U.S. lacks.

John G. Bailey, Edgemere

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Keep talking with Iran

    Keep talking with Iran

    The announcement today that the U.S. and Iran have agreed to extend talks over Tehran's disputed nuclear program is far short of what we might have hoped for. But the extension can't be counted as a failure either. If the goal is to keep up the pressure on Iran's leaders to reach a deal, keeping...

  • Five questions for Cardin

    Five questions for Cardin

    I'd like to ask five questions of Sen. Ben Cardin, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and others who support congressional review of any final U.S. nuclear agreement with Iran ("Cardin lands complicated deal with GOP, Obama on Iran," April 14):

  • A bad deal with Iran is worse than war

    A bad deal with Iran is worse than war

    Salah al-Mukhtar, a Jordanian columnist who writes for the Amman News, wrote the following reaction to the framework agreement reached between Iran and the major powers over its disputed nuclear program:

  • Iran can't be trusted to keep its word

    Iran can't be trusted to keep its word

    Your recent editorial on the U.S.-Iran nuclear talks is another indication that the liberal media does not understand that negotiating with Iran from the position of weakness is a disaster ("Negotiating with Iran," April 3).

  • Congress should not kill Iran deal

    Congress should not kill Iran deal

    South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham got it right on Sunday when he said the framework accord between Iran and the major world powers on Tehran's disputed nuclear program is probably the best deal the Obama administration could have gotten. Of course, he didn't mean it as a compliment...

  • Congress should not dismiss Iran deal

    Congress should not dismiss Iran deal

    Before those opposed to the recent deal with Iran settle on their opposition ("Negotiating with Iran," April 5), I would hope they consider the following.

  • Iran never threatened to 'wipe Israel off the map'

    Iran never threatened to 'wipe Israel off the map'

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has said that Israel will not accept any agreement that allows a country that vows to annihilate his nation to develop nuclear weapons.

  • Iran has stuck by its side of the interim deal

    Iran has stuck by its side of the interim deal

    I have rarely read a letter with so many falsehoods as the individual who recently asserted that the Iranians "have lied about working toward a nuke, where their facilities are, how any places, people and pieces of equipment they have working on projects. More importantly, they declare peaceful...

Comments
Loading

70°