Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Twinkies aren't 'health food,' but that's not why Hostess went out of business

Op-ed contributor Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson argues that the Hostess Company's bankruptcy demonstrates the negative effects of the anti-obesity movement ("An unhealthy fear," Nov. 21). But the demise of Hostess was not caused by the anti-obesity movement, and Ms. Simpson never presents any evidence that movement directly affected the company.

Ms. Simpson claims that Hostess is a "victim of another movement sweeping the country over the past couple of decades: 'low-fat' and 'health food' trends, and the current government-sponsored anti-obesity campaign."

But the only thing Hostess is a victim of is poor management and the recession. According to the Wall Street Journal, eight Hostess executives received 80 percent pay raises in 2012. Is it ethical to raise executive salaries when Hostess was in decline and had millions in debt?

The company's costs for its workers and the ingredients needed to make its products had increased, causing it to file for bankruptcy in 2004. With loans from General Electric Hostess should have bounced back, but there they were in 2012 with over $860 million in debt.

Hostess' going out of business had nothing to do with recent health food trends. Given the company's mismanagement, this "venerable American business institution" hardly seems respectable at all.

Logan Weir, Poolesville

  • Text NEWS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
  • Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
    Related Content
    • Don't blame the union in the great Twinkie debacle of 2012
      Don't blame the union in the great Twinkie debacle of 2012

      America lost one of its iconic brands last month when Hostess, maker of Twinkies, Ding Dongs, Wonder Bread and other staples of postwar Middle America, closed up shop.

    • What Twinkies teach us about labor relations
      What Twinkies teach us about labor relations

      The Great American Twinkie Crisis illuminates what is wrong with the relationship between management and labor in this country. Hostess, the company that, since the 1930s, has provided our nation with snacks that are nearly indestructible, now threatens to go out of business and leave us bereft...

    • Aid agencies sow seeds of hope
      Aid agencies sow seeds of hope

      I read the your report "Fierce clashes in Iraq as Islamic State seizes villages near Ramadi" (April 15) with a mixture of sadness, fear and exasperation.

    • MRIs for pets aren't so novel
      MRIs for pets aren't so novel

      I read your recent article about magnetic resonance imaging of pets at Johns Hopkins with great interest ("Johns Hopkins begins using high-tech equipment on pets," April 7).

    • How can Hillary Clinton be a champion of the middle class when she's part of the 1 percent?
      How can Hillary Clinton be a champion of the middle class when she's part of the 1 percent?

      Presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton says there is something wrong when CEOs make 300 times more than the typical worker. I can't help but wonder why she doesn't feel there isn't something wrong with making $300,000 for one speech.

    • NRA's paranoia is catching
      NRA's paranoia is catching

      The Sun's editorial reflecting on the National Rifle Association convention in Nashville is an important statement on how the NRA has devalued our lives and our society ("Guns and the 'permanent darkness,'" April 16).

    • Legislators have a mandate, too
      Legislators have a mandate, too

      A recent letter writer was quick to point out that Gov. Larry Hogan was sent to Annapolis to do the voters' bidding ("Hogan stands up to Democrats," April 15). What did the voters who elected members of the General Assembly get? Aren't they sent there to do the voters' bidding?

    • The importance of EMS
      The importance of EMS

      Hundreds of emergency and mobile health care professionals will soon assemble on Capitol Hill to educate Congress on their challenges in providing quality patient care to their communities and in obtaining needed resources to prepare for public health emergencies and other mass casualty incidents.

    Comments
    Loading

    72°