It's frustrating to read articles about Herman Cain that claim he is trying to capitalize on his "15 minutes of fame" ("Cain says Florida win no fluke," Sept. 27).

Using Andy Warhol's famous quote is insulting because it denigrates the work the Cain campaign has done to lift the candidate to the status he enjoys today.

I'm a tea party guy, and there's a reason Mr. Cain is a tea party favorite. Unlike other Republican primary voters, the tea party is looking for very specific things from candidates, and Mr. Cain's 9-9-9 tax formula resonates with us.

We like the fact that he talks more like a businessman than a politician. To those of us in the private sector, his way of speaking tends to sound more genuine than the typical double talk we hear from career politicians.

And if Mr. Cain can grab the tea party vote, he will have a large voting block, particularly in the Republican party primary.

Dismissing Mr. Cain because he doesn't poll well nationally right now is the same mistake the press made in 2008, when they dismissed everyone except Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani at this point in the race. Mr. Cain has a lot more than 15 minutes coming his way.

Fred Pasek, Frederick