Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

The state legislature should not regulate women's lacrosse

State Dels. Jon Cardin and Dana Stein recently introduced legislation that would mandate helmets for female lacrosse players in Maryland (House Bill 1123). The bill was supposedly introduced "mostly to get the conversation started," in the words of Mr. Cardin's spokesperson, as there was apparently no real conversation with any constituent groups prior to introduction ("Headgear bill criticized" Feb 14).

I understand that the bill has been substantially revised as a result of constituent criticism. It should be withdrawn. This is not an issue for government regulation. US lacrosse is the appropriate body to address this issue. US Lacrosse closely monitors and advocates for player safety — goggles are now required in women's lacrosse. Refs call the women's game very closely — too closely in the opinion of many — to avoid injury. Helmets are not the answer, and this issue is not the business of the General Assembly.

This bill is just one example (do we really need a state sandwich? See Senate Bill 26) of the waste of time and energy in our state legislature, not to mention the wasted time and energy of those citizens who wrote letters and made calls to bring attention to this inane bill.

Delegates, how about addressing Maryland's out of control spending and taxing? People of wealth are leaving our state — don't tell me they are not, I know them. With them go tax revenues, spending within the state and jobs. Focus on the real issue — the economic viability of our state — not helmets and sandwiches!

Timmy Ruppersberger, Baltimore

  • Text NEWS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
  • Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
    Related Content
    • Who should set the rules for lacrosse?

      Who should set the rules for lacrosse?

      Regarding your article about headgear worn by women lacrosse players, why is the government meddling in a topic it knows so little about? ("Headgear bill criticized," Feb. 14.)

    • Criminals are responsible for crime

      Criminals are responsible for crime

      Regarding the commentary, "Justice isn't blind in Baltimore" (May 28), Nancy S. Forster, a former public defender, seems to have left out the meat of the matter — the criminals themselves. Ms. Forster blames the police, the current governor and the past mayor but not one iota of responsibility...

    • Male circumcision is abhorrent, too

      Male circumcision is abhorrent, too

      Is male circumcision also a human rights violation ("Masking the truth at the BMA," May 26)? Seventy-five percent of the men in the United States have been circumcised. Fortunately, fewer circumcisions are being performed every year.

    • Don't connect Reginald Lewis and Freddie Gray

      Don't connect Reginald Lewis and Freddie Gray

      To bring Reginald Lewis into the debate surrounding the tragic death of Freddie Gray, as commentators Ron Busby Sr. and C. Earl Peek did in a recent op-ed, is wrong ("Baltimore, Reginald Lewis and Freddie Gray," May 16).

    • Trial should be in Baltimore

      Trial should be in Baltimore

      Lawyers for the officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray claim they cannot get a fair trial in Baltimore and want a change of venue ("Officers want trial moved," May 28). This is downright insulting to Baltimore jurors. If the judge in Boston refused a change of venue for the marathon bomber...

    • Take a cruise out of Baltimore? No way.

      Take a cruise out of Baltimore? No way.

      My name is Mark Brown and I am a retired yet still sworn and active law enforcement officer in North Carolina as well as the recently retired mayor of my small town.

    • Asperger's is not a mental illness

      Asperger's is not a mental illness

      In the recent article, "Teen guilty in her father's killing," The Sun quoted the defendant's lawyer in describing her as "profoundly mentally ill." You then listed her diagnoses as "Asperger's syndrome, depression, anxiety, and attention-deficit disorder."

    • Do we really care about parallel parking right now?

      Do we really care about parallel parking right now?

      Baltimore is in a state of flux, most of it on the negative side of the ledger, and The Sun is devoting editorial space to parallel parking ("Goodbye, parallel parking," May 21)?

    Comments
    Loading

    84°