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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Individuals, not employers, should make health care decisions

I agree with the title of Archbishop William E. Lori's recent Op-Ed ("A fight for freedom," June 27), but not much else. Whose freedom is the archbishop fighting for?

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishopsclaims its religious freedom is being violated by the Obama administration's decision to require all public institutions to provide insurance coverage for their employees under the Affordable Care Act, including women's contraceptive methods.

I find it ironic that while the bishops cry that their religious freedoms are being ignored, they in turn are doing the exact same thing by denying their employees the right to exercise their own personal religious beliefs.

The Catholic bishops are wrongly seeking to impose their doctrine against birth control on millions of Americans from all faiths and backgrounds who support and use contraception, including the 98 percent of American Catholic women who use contraception.

It's more than coincidental that the "Fortnight for Freedom" has begun just six weeks before the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act takes effect. This much-needed health insurance coverage is for employees and will be paid for by health insurance plans, not the Catholic Church or its institutions.

Colleen Bowers, Perry Hall

The writer, a registered nurse, is a member of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice based inWashington, D.C.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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