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Penmanship is a basic skill students still need to master [Letter]

My oh my, schools have cut out handwriting. What do they think they are doing? How are children going to sign their name?

Technology has brought many changes to our lives, but it doesn't mean we can dismiss handwriting, a basic skill. Especially in business, we must sign our names while we open a checking or savings account, sign for a loan or mortgage and any receipt must be signed when using a credit card — the preferred choice of payment for today.

A waitress comes to your table and writes your order with a pen and paper, and then goes to the computer to put the order into the kitchen. A contractor goes out to estimate a job — it is usually written and then goes back to the office and sends a computerized estimate. I wonder, though, if doctors have ever had a handwriting course.

Printing is easier on little hands; straight lines are easier to do than the swings and connections of cursive.

Yes, today there are texting and computers and fancy phones, but there are still times we need to use handwriting. When technology loses its current or battery charge, it's back to basics.

We already know the young have a hard time making change and writing a complete sentence.

Educators need to use common sense. Handwriting is a necessity.

Carole L. Bishop, Fairfield, Pa.

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