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Gun bill lacks common sense

When our elected officials announced something needed to be done about gun violence, I had hopes that we would see real solutions. On March 29, I abandoned all hope ("Gun bill advances to floor of House," March 30). Gov. Martin O'Malley's "gun safety bill" had amendments to enhance penalties and remove good time credit voted down. Actually, the amendment was approved, then the Democratic leadership strong armed delegates into re-voting and voting it down. Further, an amendment to allow off-duty police officers to carry their firearms on school grounds was voted down.

My sister went to a private school that depended on armed off-duty police officers for after-school events. Both of these amendments were common sense amendments that would have reduced all forms of violence. I noticed also how the governor fought to keep mental health reform to a minimum. There is no new funding, no new way to get help if you need it. I can see now that the governor's bill is nothing more than an attempt to destroy 2nd Amendment rights. He shows no energy, no effort, no desire to do anything about the mentally ill, or the revolving door prison system that creates so many of our problems. (Over 70 percent of gun criminals are repeat offenders.)

A recent Susquehanna Poll showed that 88 percent of Maryland residents favor enhanced penalties for those who commit crimes with a gun. I hope they will remember this in 2014.

Greg Primrose, Towson

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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