What do the recent articles regarding Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler's call for a ban on outside spending by candidates for governor and on Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's use of a "tracker" to monitor Mr. Gansler's campaign have in common? First, they are so disgusting they make me want to throw up. Second, they are two big jokes!

Mr. Gansler's call for a campaign that is clean, excluding advertisements paid for by political action committees, unions, and special interests is laughable ("Gansler proposes ban on outside spending," Nov. 12). If he wants to bring about real reform in campaign financing, his so-called candidate's pledge is not the answer. While the candidates endeavor to present themselves as champions of transparency, they are far from it in effect.

Between the two of them, Mr. Brown and Mr. Gansler, they have collected $9 million in "disguised" bribes, more commonly referred to as campaign contributions.

Additionally, when you talk about clean campaigns, what about clean tactics? The tracking of Mr. Gansler's campaign by Mr. Brown's stooge with a defense strategy of transparency issued by Mr. Brown's campaign manager is ludicrous ("Rival campaign tracks Gansler's every move," Nov. 15).

When you come down to it, do you know what the campaign is all about? Whom do you trust?

In my campaigns of 2010 and 2012, I made a commitment to the voters not take any contributions. I kept my word. The $730 I spent, by design, resulted in my receiving almost 23,000 votes. The Baltimore Sun documents the fact that on a per dollar basis, I received more votes than anybody else running for elected public office.

I am the real deal whereas Mr. Brown, Mr. Gansler, and yes, also Del. Heather Mizeur, exemplify politico wheeler dealers.

Again, the key issue is, whom do you trust? I am very comfortable letting the voters make the decision based on the facts.

Ralph Jaffe, Baltimore

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