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News Opinion Readers Respond

Did Newtown influence teen's 35-year sentence?

It should be obvious to all that the sentence imposed upon Robert Gladden is not due to his actual crimes, heinous as they were, but as a statement in response to the tragedy of Newtown ("High school shooter gets 35 years," Feb. 26). No doubt an extra 20 years was "tacked on" to show the country that Maryland is "tough on crime" and to use the Perry Hall teen-ager as a scapegoat and example for all school shootings.

Jim Jagielski, Forest Hill

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