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Autism treatment worked for my son

As the state of Maryland considers whether to continue its suspension of Dr. Mark Geier's medical license ("Discredited Lupron therapy for autism still has backers," June 17), I think it's critical for readers of The Sun to fully understand the remarkable impact that his therapies are having for families like mine around the country.

When our son Kit, who has autism, first started showing signs of violence more than two years ago, we were afraid that his unprovoked bursts of rage would result in disastrous consequences — to another child, or teacher at his school, or to my husband or me at home. The violence was both uncontrollable and unpredictable.

At first, doctors tried strong psychotropic drugs — a course of treatment that did little to relieve the underlying violence but transformed Kit into such a zombie that he could not hurt anyone even during the periods of rage.

We knew that Dr. Geier had found success in treating younger children with autism who exhibited high levels of male hormones but did not realize that he had experience with teenagers like our son. Dr. Geier evaluated our son and his blood tests and discovered that Kit's hormone levels were far higher the typical 13-to-15-year-old. In the most simplistic of terms, one could almost think of Kit's periods of violence as similar to the steroid rage of bodybuilders ingesting performance enhancing drugs.

After beginning a therapy that involved reducing the levels of male hormones, we have found our son again, our sweet boy, without the violence. The treatment literally saved our family. Without this protocol, I have no doubt that our son would have ultimately been taken away from us for the violent threat he posed at home and at school.

Amy M. Carson, Leicester, N.C.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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