In a recent letter, Joan Anderson expressed her concerns that Attorney General Douglas Gansler and his running mate would had been more understanding of senior issues than any other team running for governor ("Who is the candidate for seniors?" July 5). She cited no specifics for her reasoning.

The Maryland Attorney General's office has a department called the Health Education Advocacy Unit (HAU). The unit's primary charge is to address issues and circumstances encountered by the elderly.

I went to this system on the behalf of my 91-year-old father who had been swindled by a durable medical provider. What was provided to the attorney general's office was proof beyond any reasonable doubt the company had deliberately forged Medicare documents and provided my father with the wrong equipment.

All I was met with from the AG's office was stalling and comments that "...we negotiate, and this takes time..."

Eventually, Mr. Gansler's chief deputy became involved, and the process became even more complicated. Also at the time of my efforts to right this wrong, The Scooter Store, a national chain, was brought down by the FBI and a special Medicare team on charges of Medicare fraud — the same sort of scheme that had been perpetrated on my father. The company had been indicted before, but the Gansler team wanted to negotiate.

Through the process, I not only had to point out that a state agency had failed to take a reasonable legal action against a common group of criminals but had to spend time researching law and fact issues related to the legal incompetence of the attorney general's office.

Good riddance to Mr. Gansler. Hopefully, the new AG will make it a priority to upgrade its response.

Bill Alcarese, Baltimore

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