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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Could fracking for natural gas be the cause of Tuesday's earthquake?

If you compare a map of this country's fracking sites with one of U.S. nuclear power plants, you will see that on both maps the area from the Great Lakes to the East Coast is the area of greatest concentration for both, and they overlap. If you then search "fracking and earthquakes" you'll see huge amounts of evidence relating the two. In the area affected by Tuesday's earthquake there are around 40 nuclear reactors, (25 of which are 30 years old or older).

What's been happening over the past few years is that as nonrenewable natural gas supplies dwindle, fracking efforts have become more extreme: drilling is deeper, more fluid volume is forced in, more toxins are used. Thus, with this increased violence, we can expect more earthquakes.

After yesterday's earthquake, one nuclear plant was shut down and 12 others reported unusual incidents. With continued fracking, it's a matter of time until we see a nuclear accident. Do any of our major metropolitan areas have an evacuation plan? Or a plan to distribute potassium iodide (taken after a nuclear accident to prevent radiation poisoning) to the populace?

Can we depend on our governments at any level to make sure we have our iodide, or a way out, when the inevitable happens? I suggest you lay in your own supplies and make an exit plan.

Beverly Mesch, Cape Coral, Fla.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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