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News Opinion Readers Respond

Guns and 'unhealthy' attachments to them

I am endlessly amazed, even stultified at times, regarding how a person's wearing of a firearm gives that person a feeling of invincibility, if you will.

The most recent issue deals with Baltimore Police training instructor William Kern, and his love affair with his weapon or "attachment," as prosecutors termed it ("Training instructor had 'unhealthy attachment' to gun, state says," Oct. 15).

It was also noted that Mr. Kern had accidentally pulled out his weapon twice before he shot University of Maryland police recruit Raymond Gray during training exercises.

The most appalling thing was The Sun's account of Mr. Kern's behavior after he plugged Mr. Gray's head with a bullet. He did not assist his victim after he shot him, even refusing to surrender his weapon to a fellow officer.

It's simply another situation where a person wields a firearm to make a statement about, above else, their absolute insecurity and an unfounded belief that they are above us mere mortals. Guns are simply pacifiers for "older" children, as Mr. Kern's behavior attests.

Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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