I keep hearing that the old Fawcett Boat Supplies building in Annapolis is an eyesore made of cinder block that obstructs the view of Ego Alley ("Annapolis whiffs again," July 11).

But only one side of the building is cinder block, and an outdoor photo mural is also placed there along with shade trees and benches. The remaining three sides are brick and baby blue-painted wood in reasonably well maintained shape.

This building was used as a supermarket in the 1950s. Do we give up on other older buildings next?

As for increasing the building's height, that would only block more of the view toward Ego Alley and tower over an area that needs vertical open space. It would also destroy the human scale that the city long ago set in stone.

I am concerned that Annapolis Mayor Josh Cohen seems ready to give away valuable, city-owned land to an out-of-town developer. What is with this? Is it even legal?

The whole thing sounds like a bad deal for the city, so why is the mayor so intent on rushing it through? Even though two years have been invested on this grand project, it shouldn't be the only driving factor to drastically change a city founded in 1649.

Brian Porter, Annapolis

The writer is general manager of the Fleet Reserve Club of Annapolis.