Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

New EPA standards are vital to the bay's future health [Letter]

As a resident of Howard County I am excited about the landmark federal standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency ("Carbon rules can work," June 2).

This week, the EPA proposed the first-ever federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants, the largest single source of global-warming pollution in America.

For many of us who live around the Chesapeake, home isn't really home without the bay. Climate change is significantly disrupting the ecosystem and jeopardizing countless species everyday. I shudder at the thought of going a summer without the blue crabs I've taken for granted for so many years. I care about global warming because I want to preserve the bay I grew up on for the future.

The National Climate Assessment, released in May, recognized today's impacts: "Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present," it said. The EPA's proposal, once finalized, will be the largest step the U.S. has ever taken to combat global warming and it's our best chance to give our children a legacy we can be proud of.

This announcement is a huge win for the health of our families and our environment. It is in large part a testament to the millions of Americans, more than 600 local elected officials and hundreds of small businesses who have already demanded cutting carbon pollution.

These standards are being continually attacked, but I hope lawmakers look to the example set by Maryland and other states that have already enacted similar cap-and-trade programs and support these historic federal limits.

Aseem Singh

-
To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • The wrong turn in the Arctic

    The wrong turn in the Arctic

    Nobody in their right mind vacations in the Chukchi or Beaufort seas. Only hard core geography buffs can even name them. Instagram isn't filled with photographs of close encounters with Arctic whales or polar bears. It is a cold and hostile environment.

  • The danger of climate denial

    The danger of climate denial

    It's Memorial Day, and the forecast is for renewed mocking and derision regarding man-made climate change from the know-nothing, science-averse wing of the Republican Party. President Barack Obama's warning — issued during his commencement address at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy graduation ceremonies...

  • Elsa and Olaf: climate change ambassadors

    Elsa and Olaf: climate change ambassadors

    Do you want to build a snowman?

  • Maryland needs renewable energy

    Maryland needs renewable energy

    The first day of spring ironically delivered another snowstorm in Maryland ("Before spring, snow threatens Baltimore once more," March 19). Fluke weather patterns are expected to become more severe as climate change persists. The extreme shifts from warm sunny days to cold, wintry ones takes a...

  • Climate change is real (despite what some Md. legislators say)

    Climate change is real (despite what some Md. legislators say)

    I'm glad the climate change bill was approved by the Maryland Senate but sorry to see it passed strictly along partisan lines ("Climate change bill passes Senate on party line vote," March 10).

  • Snow falls, climate changes

    Snow falls, climate changes

    For those who have found the cold, snowy winter of 2014-2015 more than mildly irritating and the words, "be grateful you don't live in Boston" insufficiently comforting, today's snowfall may have pushed you over the edge. Not only because it shut down schools, governments and businesses and left...

  • Romney's climate change conversion

    Romney's climate change conversion

    I couldn't help noting the irony of your recent editorial on the last days of climate-change denial appearing shortly after Mitt Romney announced his decision not to run for the White House in 2016 ("Last gasp for climate change denial?" Feb. 2).

  • Last gasp for climate change denial?

    Last gasp for climate change denial?

    Editor's note: This editorial has been updated to reflect that Resources for the Future is not a part of Stanford University. The Sun regrets the error. 

Comments
Loading

70°