Summer Savings! Get unlimited digital access for 13 weeks for $13.
Readers Respond
News Opinion Readers Respond

Sandy offered a lesson in climate change

For almost 30 years now, Hieronimus & Co. in its various radio broadcasts, television, print, online, and other public forums has addressed the increasing weather extremes as a result of global warming. This discussion began in earnest in 1985 among scientists, and only now is it becoming self-evident with the October surprise of Hurricane Sandy, not to mention the severe droughts, floods, record temperatures worldwide, and other anomalous weather patterns and their deleterious impacts on animals, nature and humans.

As the East Coast encounters this "Frankenstorm," I hope more citizens appreciate the lackluster environmental policies promoted by former Gov. Mitt Romney and less than robust initiatives of the Congress and President Barack Obama whom I voted for and will again. It is also possible to see that dividing citizens is not a progressive nor productive outcome of the current election or media and is the result of the outright corporate theft of what once was a prerogative of citizens. Candidates are now bought and sold by their underwriters rather than being chosen by the people they are obligated to serve. We all must hold Congress accountable for their perpetual failure regarding our earth's well being.

In fact, what we need now on Earth as in America is unity. The consequences of our 100 years of polluting the seas, the skies, the soil and our food system for short-sighted corporate profit means that everyone will suffer together for generations to come.

Now is the time to use our best intelligence and our greatest loving hearts to pursue sustainable energy systems, agricultural and environmental strategies as we vigorously pursue proper stewardship of the earth.

May Hurricane Sandy be a teacher that promotes why we must work together in realizing that "what we do to the earth, we do to ourselves," which was the slogan I coined in 1990 for Earth Day in Maryland. Every day is an Earth Day, and we are called to loving union to correct what we can plainly see has been driven by greed and an entrenched status quo, rather than by a life economy guided by reverence for all that exists on this great planet Earth.

Zohara M. Hieronimus, Owings Mills

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • After Hurricane Sandy, can we finally talk about climate change?

    After Hurricane Sandy, can we finally talk about climate change?

    The candidates won't discuss a warming planet, but Hurricane Sandy filled in the silence

  • Baltimore needs BRT

    Baltimore needs BRT

    Recently, Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford announced that Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) should be considered as an alternative instead of the now-shelved Red Line light rail system ("Who knew Hogan, Rutherford were such transit geeks," July 15). Why? Costs. Light rail is extremely expensive — to the tune of...

  • Iran deal — war now or war later

    Iran deal — war now or war later

    In its recent editorial, The Sun adopts President Barack Obama's primary argument in favor of the Iran deal — that the only choice is the deal or war ("A 'good enough' agreement," July 24). No one wants war. But the choice here is not war or no war. It is war now or war later.

  • The evil of Iran

    The evil of Iran

    We sat 5,000-plus strong in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in the District of Columbia for three intense days of Christians United For Israel (CUFI) 10th summit on July 12-14. We came from all across the nation (including 95 members from other countries and 500 college students). We...

  • Orioles: No gnomes, please

    Orioles: No gnomes, please

    In light of the Orioles recent near-death spiral, many fans have pinned the blame on the Buck Showalter Garden Gnome giveaway ("Buck Showalter garden gnome briefly causes long lines at Camden Yards," June 28). True, their record since the promotion has been dismal and Buck Showalter was warned...

  • Baltimore remains a fiber desert

    Baltimore remains a fiber desert

    Like Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's Smarter Baltimore draft report, the commentary, "Broadband for Baltimore" (July 27), has solid recommendations for building high speed Internet in Baltimore. But like that report, it ignores the principal reason that Baltimore City doesn't have broadband. Verizon's...

Comments
Loading
73°