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News Opinion Readers Respond

When are we going to get serious about climate change? [Letter]

In his ardent defense of the natural gas industry, letter writer Robert C. Erlandson worries that "economic progress" — by which he means the Cove Point LNG project — may be stifled by "environmental zealots" ("Study LNG exports but decide soon" April 7).

Clearly Mr. Erlandson is unworried by any long-term negative environmental impact the facility may have.

Yet American and international businesses are spending huge sums of money to buy up vast territories around and above the Arctic circle to exploit the region's oil and mineral deposits when global warming melts enough of the ice cap to permit full-scale operations.

Military and political leaders around the world are also preparing to deal with the many social crises that will occur when populations around the world are confronted with catastrophic food and water shortages, starvation and forced migration into countries that do not want them.

These business, military and political leaders are hard-headed realists, not "environmental zealots." They understand that global warming is real, serious and that its effects will become increasingly severe in the foreseeable future.

The shouldn't be "is it real" but rather "what to do about it?" Continuing to pretend that a few jobs or the price of gasoline in the U.S. is the big issue is not helpful. We and our children have far more dangerous problems ahead. When are we going to get serious about them?

Bradley Alger, Baltimore

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