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Time to abolish Electoral College

A recent Baltimore Sun article, "Election remake hits hurdles," (Jan. 29) brings to light new thoughts on how to change the rules of the Electoral College. At the present time, all states use the winner-take-all system except two, Maine and Nebraska. These states allow a proportional electoral vote based on their congressional districts.

The article relates how, recently, various governors, senators and congressmen have suggested various schemes for revising the rules, most of them based on the award of electoral votes by the popular vote winners in their congressional districts. The most bizarre idea mentioned is one where two electoral votes would be given to the winner of the statewide vote, and the remainder would be divided according to the percentage of the popular vote that each candidate receives.

Most everyone agrees that at every governmental level and even within private associations of all types, the most logical and democratic way to determine a winner, whether it is for an individual or for the passage of a resolution, is by direct popular vote. This also should apply to the office of the president of the United States. The time has come to abolish the Electoral College rather than tinker with it.

George Stiegler, Ellicott City

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