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Hagel defense budget would put U.S. at risk [Letter]

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's plans for a reduction of the active Army strength from 520,000 to around 440,000 are not only unreasonable and bad, but they will also hurt our safety and security and ability to defend ourselves against any future conflicts ("A smaller, more nimble force," Feb. 27).

Such a foolish proposal will shrink the Army to its smallest size since before World War II. The Army is not alone in Mr. Hagel's proposal. The reduction is part of the Pentagon's $75 billion budget cut over the next two years. This will affect all branches of the armed services.

Such a proposal would also involve greater risk if U.S. forces were asked to carry out two large-scale military actions at the same time.

Is this yet another example how President Barack Obama wants to remake and change America?

When President Obama submits this to Congress, it up to Congress to vote it down.

Al Eisner, Silver Spring

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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