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Dwyer should be held to a higher standard

Reading the article on Del. Don Dwyer's boating-while-intoxicated sentence was interesting ("Dwyer sentenced to 30 days in jail in drunken boating incident," May 14). Drinking and boating is playing Russian roulette. If you are in an accident you may survive but you may destroy others lives. He stated that "those who made the laws have an obligation to obey them." When he found out he would have to spend 30 days in jail, his obligation ended. He's appealing his conviction.

I agree completely with Judge Robert Wilcox who presided over the case. Mr. Dwyer should be held to a higher standard. We as citizens should expect our elected officials to uphold the same laws that we must adhere too. He caused much pain and injury to those he crashed into. They will carry that experience with them forever.

His attorney feels that the sentence was inappropriate. How dare him. Mr. Dwyer committed a serious crime by willingly boating while intoxicated. The fact that he is in an alcohol treatment program is laughable. If he drinks as much as he did that day, he should have done this some time ago. The only reason he is doing this is because he was caught.

All those who drink and boat (or drive) should be brought before Judge Wilcox. We may not have as many deaths and near fatal injuries if all arrested for this crime would be treated as Mr. Dwyer is. I hope his appeal fails. This would be a slap in the face of conscientious judges trying to stop this flagrant crime.

Lois Raimondi Munchel, Forest Hill

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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