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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Why should taxpayers be forced to rescue people from their own bad decisions?

In the April 27 edition of The Sun there was a story by Kevin Rector about recently passed legislation to allow home prescriptions of Naloxone that could be administered to users of heroin who have overdosed ("Maryland families to get new tool in fight against drug overdoses"). In the article it was reported that the program will cost $50,000 in the next fiscal year and will increase over time. Why is it that every time someone makes a poor life decision, in this case using heroin, the remainder of society bears the burden for that poor decision?

In these austere times when taxpayers are told that they must continually pay more and more to cover the cost of the programs that our politicians invent, there must be some limit. In the article, Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, the Maryland Secretary of health and mental hygiene, said the costs would not be a major burden. I don't know about everyone else but I think $50,000 is a lot of money. We as taxpayers are constantly told that there is not enough money to cover the cost of providing basic services for all the people and we must continually pay more. If we didn't need to pay for programs that are designed for people who made poor decisions, perhaps the rest of us would be a little better off. While I feel sympathy for anyone who loses a loved one, these heroin addicts made the decision by themselves to abuse this drug.

Melvin Lindsay, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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