Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
NewsOpinionReaders Respond

Time for 1 percent to pony up

As a resident of Maryland, I am outraged by the recent "doomsday budget" and the real possibility of more cuts in vital services like law enforcement, education, libraries, reduction of personnel, etc. I find it unacceptable when I hear or read about major corporations complaining that they are being overtaxed and threaten to move their operations overseas. Some of these companies exploit loopholes in the tax laws to leave billions in unpaid taxes for the 99 percent of us to shoulder the burden.

According to a study by the Citizens for Tax Justice, over the past four years from 2008 to 2011, big corporations have enjoyed billions of dollars in tax subsidies and profits. We cannot continue to give tax subsidies to billionaires while seniors live on less, while we ignore dilapidated infrastructure and close down schools.

As the deficit continues to grow and unemployment remains high, it's time for corporations and members of the 1 percent to step up and do their fair share — by paying what they owe. Our members of Congress should support the Buffett Rule which stops millionaires from paying lower tax rates than working people. They should also work to close any tax loopholes that let corporations pay lower taxes.

Alicia H. Champlin, Baltimore

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Buffett's claims about tax rates unproven

    In your editorial regarding the proposed tax increase for high-earners ("The Buffett Rule backlash," April 12)," you state that Warren Buffett's secretarial staff "were shown to pay a higher percentage of their income to the tax man than their billionaire boss."

  • Maryland's unfriendly business climate kills another 1,000 jobs
    Maryland's unfriendly business climate kills another 1,000 jobs

    Maryland is incredibly unfriendly to business with its heavy burden of regulations, high taxes and an out-of-control minority business enterprise extortion process that enriches a few African-Americans without hiring the inner city minorities it is designed to assist ("The Bechtel blame...

  • Don't let Maryland turn into Illinois [Letter]
    Don't let Maryland turn into Illinois [Letter]

    On the same day that The Baltimore Sun publishes "As recovery continues, Maryland households fall behind" (Oct. 11), the newspaper also prints an article about the trucker shortage ("Trucker shortage looms large as Baltimore port eyes growth").

  • Spending cuts aren't cheap [Letter]
    Spending cuts aren't cheap [Letter]

    A reader argues that overspending is the problem in Annapolis ("Maryland's spending problem," Sept. 29).

  • Maryland's spending problem [Letter]
    Maryland's spending problem [Letter]

    Dreary job reports coupled with the news that Maryland is projecting $405 million in less revenue for the current fiscal year and the next has caused the O'Malley/Brown cheerleaders at The Sun to put on the pompoms and go into full attack mode ("Apocalypse? Not now," Sept. 26)....

  • Politics as usual on state budget numbers [Letter]
    Politics as usual on state budget numbers [Letter]

    Having spent 47 years in state and local government, I have a pretty good feel for impending fiscal year budget problems ("Apocalypse? Not now," Sept. 26). The very quietly issued projections for the next fiscal year for the state budget are concerning. That the state has already,...

  • High taxes = lost jobs = deficit [Letter]
    High taxes = lost jobs = deficit [Letter]

    Why doesn't The Sun ask Gov. Martin O'Malley if taxing the businesses that left the state or did not locate here in the first place because of the high taxes had anything to do with declining tax revenue ("The budget apocalypse that isn't," Sept. 26)? That will be the...

  • The budget apocalypse that isn't [Editorial]
    The budget apocalypse that isn't [Editorial]

    Our view: Are new revenue estimates a reason to look for spending cuts? Yes. Are they a repudiation of the O'Malley fiscal and economic legacy? Hardly

Comments
Loading