Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99
News Opinion Readers Respond

More spending on education doesn't necessarily mean better schools

Donald F. Norris gives us a liberal rant in his recent commentary about education funding ("Flacco's pay and our skewed priorities," June 12).

He says he has but "little" envy for Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco's pay and that the star player's $20 million yearly salary is not his reason for writing. Yet, his attack on the business of sports, and on entertainment generally, contradicts that assertion. And so far as professional sports and public education are concerned, he seems to think that apples are oranges.

Mr. Norris says he wants "greater funding" for public education in America — as if more money necessarily means better education. Does it? Perhaps he needs to do some "analysis and research" at the "institute" he directs. The facts might surprise him.

In any event, he contradicts himself when he pats himself on the back for the fine job he and his colleagues at University of Maryland Baltimore County are doing. If Mr. Norris is to be believed regarding funding, it is a miracle that UMBC is able to function at all.

But it is in the final two paragraphs that Mr. Norris reveals who he is and what the true point of his ramblings is. He wants me to feel guilty because I am a middle class taxpayer, have a flat-screen TV (actually I have two) and "buy the goods and services sold by advertisers and sponsors of the games."

Apparently, he would have me not buy tickets to see the Ravens play, not watch TV, not use the services of Comcast, etc., so that I could put the money in his pockets and those of his colleagues, who are, after all, "hardly slackers." (I would love to know what his salary is.)

Tellingly, no blame is placed on Gov. Martin O'Malley and his liberal colleagues in Annapolis for what Mr. Norris regards as America's failure to "adequately fund education." I am left to wonder why. And I am also left to wonder if there is any amount of money that would satisfy the expansionist dreams outlined in Mr. Norris' commentary.

George E. Bell

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Md. Democrats offer ruinous agenda
    Md. Democrats offer ruinous agenda

    I wonder where the rulers in the Maryland Senate and House of Delegates are going to get the money to fund what Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller described as the Democratic agenda ("Senate panel rewrites Hogan's charter school law," March 26)? I guess they will do what they do every...

  • Don't shed tears for Bergdahl
    Don't shed tears for Bergdahl

    Your editorial regarding Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is typical of The Sun's liberal agenda ("Hero or traitor?" March 27). So much concern for the deserter, but nary a word about the six men who gave their lives trying to rescue him.

  • Black-on-black crime is not just a problem for blacks
    Black-on-black crime is not just a problem for blacks

    Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has sent a message to African-American men to step up and take responsibility for guiding black youths away from violence ("City leaders call on black men to mentor youths and stop the violence," March 25).

  • Maryland needs renewable energy
    Maryland needs renewable energy

    The first day of spring ironically delivered another snowstorm in Maryland ("Before spring, snow threatens Baltimore once more," March 19). Fluke weather patterns are expected to become more severe as climate change persists. The extreme shifts from warm sunny days to cold, wintry ones takes...

  • Supergirl for the modern era
    Supergirl for the modern era

    Great news that comic book publishers will be adding to the existing line-up of female superheroes ("Supergirl power," March 27)!

  • The downside of China's 'thriving' economy
    The downside of China's 'thriving' economy

    Like many individuals and corporations, Charles Campbell equates success with money ("Why China is passing us up," March 25).

Comments
Loading