Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

More spending on education doesn't necessarily mean better schools

Donald F. Norris gives us a liberal rant in his recent commentary about education funding ("Flacco's pay and our skewed priorities," June 12).

He says he has but "little" envy for Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco's pay and that the star player's $20 million yearly salary is not his reason for writing. Yet, his attack on the business of sports, and on entertainment generally, contradicts that assertion. And so far as professional sports and public education are concerned, he seems to think that apples are oranges.

Mr. Norris says he wants "greater funding" for public education in America — as if more money necessarily means better education. Does it? Perhaps he needs to do some "analysis and research" at the "institute" he directs. The facts might surprise him.

In any event, he contradicts himself when he pats himself on the back for the fine job he and his colleagues at University of Maryland Baltimore County are doing. If Mr. Norris is to be believed regarding funding, it is a miracle that UMBC is able to function at all.

But it is in the final two paragraphs that Mr. Norris reveals who he is and what the true point of his ramblings is. He wants me to feel guilty because I am a middle class taxpayer, have a flat-screen TV (actually I have two) and "buy the goods and services sold by advertisers and sponsors of the games."

Apparently, he would have me not buy tickets to see the Ravens play, not watch TV, not use the services of Comcast, etc., so that I could put the money in his pockets and those of his colleagues, who are, after all, "hardly slackers." (I would love to know what his salary is.)

Tellingly, no blame is placed on Gov. Martin O'Malley and his liberal colleagues in Annapolis for what Mr. Norris regards as America's failure to "adequately fund education." I am left to wonder why. And I am also left to wonder if there is any amount of money that would satisfy the expansionist dreams outlined in Mr. Norris' commentary.

George E. Bell

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • At root of much youth violence is hunger
    At root of much youth violence is hunger

    Your article, "City's violence can take hidden toll" (Dec. 14), was important in that it outlined the issues of crime in neighborhoods and help that is being undertaken to curb the violence from the children of this city. It is important, but it doesn't address the cause for some of the...

  • Dealing with childhood violence
    Dealing with childhood violence

    Thank you for Andrea McDaniels' brilliant article on the impact of violence on children ("Advocates aim to save Baltimore children from impact of violence," Dec. 14). Pediatricians are so concerned about this issue — called Adverse Childhood Experiences — that we have made the...

  • Reduce littering? Yes. Death wish? No
    Reduce littering? Yes. Death wish? No

    I write in response to Charlotte Eliopoulos' criticism of Dan Rodricks and the other "older guys" on the bus who did not confront the young guy who threw a McDonald's bag into the street ("Littering comes down to a question of attitude," Dec. 14). Someone needs to remind her that it is not...

  • Big Ag must be held to account for bay pollution
    Big Ag must be held to account for bay pollution

    Dan Rodricks' arguments for protecting the Chesapeake Bay from pollution from chicken farms could have been even stronger ("Larry Hogan has a chance to be a green governor," Dec. 13).

  • Injustice is invisible to some
    Injustice is invisible to some

    Letter writer Charlotte Eliopoulos has the audacity to compare littering to the loss of life of three black males from the "bullets of policemen." And she further writes that "...had [the dead black men] been taught and held accountable [I guess she means not to litter] for proper behavior they...

  • Democrats wrong to criticize 9/11 response
    Democrats wrong to criticize 9/11 response

    I am grateful to those who were in charge after 9/11 for taking actions to protect our country, me and my family and our way of life.

Comments
Loading