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DNA database has potential medical benefits

I would like to respond to Dan Rodricks' column on taking DNA samples from people who are arrested ("DNA: Why wait for an arrest?" May 3).

I support his opinion, but I think he could have included more reasons, especially for a general gathering of DNA. If all of us gave samples, the medical world would benefit tremendously. Close matching organ donors could be located immediately. Untold information could ease the tracking of diseases from the common cold to virulent cancers.

We should demand that the government take our DNA! This would prove to be vital to our national health if this information is placed in medical databases. What are we waiting for?

Mike Brown, Havre de Grace

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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