Save 75% - Only $49.99 for 1 full year! digitalPLUS subscription offer ends 12/1
NewsOpinionReaders Respond

A double standard for cruise ships?

U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyShipbuildingExecutive BranchManufacturing and EngineeringEnvironmental Politics

Regarding your article about Gov. Martin O'Malley's efforts to pressure the Environmental Protection Agency to relax its "clean fuel" requirements for large cruise ships, it seems that both the Royal Caribbean and the Carnival lines have hinted they might move their businesses out of Baltimore Harbor If the EPA doesn't back down ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16).

The governor's press secretary even said that some 220 jobs and about $90 million a year could be lost to our region if the cruise lines make good on their threat.

Yet I sense an air of hypocrisy from our so called "green governor." I certainly don't remember Mr. O'Malley standing up to the EPA when it imposed their new water quality standards for the Chesapeake Bay that resulted in the so-called "rain tax" being shoved down our throats by him and a compliant General Assembly.

It seems the lesson from this is it's OK if big cruise ship operators belch huge amounts of sulfur, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter into the air and water, because they use cheap "bunker" diesel fuel.

Meanwhile, the rest of us "little people" get to pay the "rain tax" because we're unfortunate enough to have a roof over our heads or — dare I say it — a driveway for our cars.

What a joke!

Mark Wilson, Fallston

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyShipbuildingExecutive BranchManufacturing and EngineeringEnvironmental Politics
Comments
Loading