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News Opinion Readers Respond

Fight crime with secure buildings, more jail time

After seeing the security tapes of the Navy Yard shooter in the hallways, it's hard to believe the building's surveillance cameras are not monitored in real time. Had this been the case, the shooter could have been stopped long before he killed so many. Many office buildings and high rise condominium buildings do this, so why not the Navy Yard? Some are quick to blame guns, but look at the lack of security at what is supposed to be a very secure place. This outcome could have been much different.

As far as crime, the courts need to stop the wrist-slapping and put the lawbreakers in jail and keep them there for the duration of the given sentence. Some will say there is not enough room in the jails and we can't afford to build more. To this I say, double up or triple up the number of inmates per cell, have them rotate, working eight hour shifts each doing outside work and suddenly the cells won't be so crowded.

Since the streets and roads of the city and county are in such deplorable condition, send the inmates out to do road work. Give them buckets of asphalt and shovels to fill pot holes. Hire some more guards if need be and create jobs at the same time we fix the roads. Having the inmates work will save us money and be much better for them than laying around the jailhouse. Maybe they will learn that work isn't so bad.

I know, I know, the American Civil Liberties Union and the politically correct types will say this is cruel treatment of the prisoners, but hey, abide by the laws and treat other people with respect and you won't be in that situation.

Ed Hall, Carney

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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