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News Opinion Readers Respond

Tougher limits on crabs would benefit watermen [Letter]

I'd like to put in my two cents worth on the blue crab situation in the Chesapeake Bay. In his letter, Richard Anderson made a valid point as to the size of the industry and number of people that would be affected ("Crabbing moratorium isn't the answer," May 7). However, Mr. Anderson should be more aware of the full choice between losing business for one year and losing it forever. One female crab can repopulate the entire species, and they should be protected and banned from harvesting.

This approach seems to be working in the North Seas with king crabs. I would also suggest raising the minimum keeper size by one-quarter inch, although I recognize that Virginia is not subject to our laws, which is too bad. There is so little meat in small crabs.

I would suggest that imported crabs could help keep a lot of the industry Mr. Anderson is talking about going while we fix our problem — just as they do every winter. Also, I am against increasing rockfish limits as the current system has worked well to keep a constant flow of large fish available for charters and the commercial demand as well.

The Chesapeake Bay is what makes Maryland what it is. All across the country, they sell Maryland-style crab cakes. There is no question something has to be done.

Steven Davidson, New Windsor

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