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Young people need to learn to take responsibility for their actions

Last week the Associated Press ran a story about New York City officials dispensing morning after pills to girls at 50 local high schools. In the article, Dr. Cora Breuner, an advocate for teen use of birth control, was quoted as saying that "if you use it in a timely fashion, It provides relief or solace to a young woman or man who has made a mistake but doesn't want to have to live with that mistake for the rest of their lives."

The callous and selfish nature of this statement is unbelievable. I know many parents, wed and unwed, who have had unplanned children. But save for a little worrying about the consequences of their actions, I don't know of any who would wish their children away, or consider them to be a "mistake" they have to live with.

Dr. Breuner's statement is an example of everything that is wrong with today's advocates for a zero-personal accountability culture.

Despite studies showing the negative impact on society of such zero accountability solutions as abortion, we continue to double down on these failed policies.

Instead of using pharmaceuticals to destroy embryonic life and simplify the lives of wayward adolescents, maybe we should try teaching these children that their actions have consequences.

Tom Jones, Annapolis

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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