As an upcoming sophomore at St. Mary's College of Maryland, I believe The Sun owes a public apology to St. Mary's for unjustly striking out at the school. I have never heard a person say that they don't like St. Mary's until this recent commentary by Anne Neal of the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, "Cautionary campus tale," (May 30) appeared in your newspaper.

I am not going to go on for a long time regarding the biased opinions, several grammatical mistakes or how it represents an outsider's point of view. I would, however, like to point out that the author cited information provided by her own organization. I also Googled her and, ironically, the first photo that comes up is a picture of her with her nose up in the air with the description of Harvard University under the photo. Jokes aside, no one wants to pick up a newspaper and see the school they adore being publicly insulted, especially without proper research. St. Mary's is adored and protected by its students and alumni which is probably why you are getting complaints.

To address the article in short:

Yes, the prices are high, but that goes toward good food, the waterfront activities, and supplies for the courses. I am part of the St. Mary's esteemed biology program, and something unique about the science building is the presence of a wet lab. This allows us to work hands on with what we are studying. We also have programs that work with the Chesapeake Bay, a tributary of which comes right through campus.

The seminars are designed to get you comfortable with using the resources on campus while teaching you the concepts behind a specific subject as a method of applying the skills we learned in class and in high school.

St. Mary's attracts a certain kind of person. I can't explain it, but almost everyone I've met there is open minded, active, and passionate about learning. People who can't pay the tuition can join the scholarship program and go on a free trip to do service in a foreign country. If you don't like nature or small, tight knit communities, then St. Mary's is not for you.

St. Mary's had a high number of acceptances but it was an illusion because of the common college application. Many people applied who were not truly interested because the common "app" made it easy, and believe me, the 150 under enrollment has only brought St. Mary's closer and made us more determined to attract more students and funding. If only you could see all the students who showed up to the emergency budget meeting that occurred a week after classes had ended. The message is clear. We care about our school.

So once again, I plead for a public apology or a rewrite that shows the real St. Mary's that everyone loves. If The Sun continues to promote this opinion, then I will start a movement among St. Mary's students and alumni to boycott The Sun because it has clearly shown that it is not an accredited newspaper.

Melanie