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Climate change toadies

U.S. CongressKeystone XL Pipeline

While reading the front page of The Sun the article on the loss of amphibians ("Alarming U.S. decline in environment's sentinels," May 23), I heard on the radio that Congress is trying to assure construction of the Alberta tar sands pipeline.

About two weeks ago, scientists reported that the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere had reached 400 parts per million. There has been a chance that the percentage of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could at least be stabilized, but with the construction of the pipeline this would no longer be possible.

If Congress is able to get the Keystone XL pipeline constructed I would like so see the names of all people who voted for this carved in stone so that they be identified for eternity for anyone or anything that can read them.

David Ingalls, Severna Park

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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U.S. CongressKeystone XL Pipeline
  • Keystone comes up dry
    Keystone comes up dry

    Tuesday evening's Senate vote to approve the Keystone XL pipeline may have come up one vote shy of the necessary 60-vote margin, but it's surely not the last we've heard of the project. Republicans have become so enamored of TransCanada's vision of a 1,200-mile link from Canadian tar sands...

  • Keystone XL is an outdated technology for meeting tomorrow's needs
    Keystone XL is an outdated technology for meeting tomorrow's needs

    It makes no sense to invest billions of dollars in a dead-end technology like the Keystone XL pipeline, which will be obsolete and of ever-declining value over the next dozen years as we burn up yet more of our dwindling fossil fuel reserves ("Keystone comes up dry," Nov. 19).

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