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News Opinion Readers Respond

Where's the urgency to addressing global climate change?

Your editorial on the International Energy Agency's "World Energy Outlook Special Report: Redrawing the Climate Energy Map" was right on the money ("Climate change warnings," June 11).

Having read several books about the lead-up to World War II, it is as if the same phenomenon of global denial is in operation here all over again. The harsh reality is quite clear to those who are paying even the slightest bit of attention, but no one wants to acknowledge or do anything about it.

Humanity is racing at breakneck speed toward the edge of the deepest drop-off it has ever faced — and everyone is arguing about where they will sit. Or they are refusing to acknowledge that a cliff is there at all.

The same was true prior to World War II. Hitler started rebuilding the German war machine. The world did nothing. He invaded a country. The world did nothing. He invaded another country. The world did nothing.

British Prime Minister Nevil Chamberlain negotiated what he thought was peace. It amounted to nothing. The United Nations has had yearly climate change negotiations and treaties. They have amounted to nothing.

Finally, the situation prior to World War II was so grave that billboards begin to appear in the heart of London: "What Price Churchill?"

Billion-dollar weather events continue to increase in frequency and cost. We have had Superstorm Sandy, wildfires in the West, drought in the Midwest and record-breaking annual average temperatures. Arctic ice is melting at a rate humanity has never seen before. The world has done nothing.

The United States has done least of all. We are the nation most responsible for global warming. We have the greatest financial capital of any nation. We have the greatest intellectual capital of any nation. We have the greatest moral and ethical responsibility as the world's only superpower to play a leadership role in dealing with the climate crisis. And we have done nothing.

We don't have even yet billboards asking: "What Price Climate Action?"

Jeff Cobb, Cincinnati, Ohio

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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