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Climate-change deniers deny human role in global warming

Global warming should be more in the news, with interviews with climatologists and scientists who study weather. There has been much coverage of the destruction wrought by Superstorm Sandy, but little about the changing weather patterns that cause such events.

Many people believe that weather patterns are cyclical. But while the weather does seem to go in cycles, the number and ferocity of storms has increased in recent years.

Yet there are people who remain in denial about the damage done to the people and places where these killer storms strike. They don't want to believe that human actions — through carbon pollution and greenhouse gas emissions — play a role in the number and ferocity of storms. Nor do politicians want to touch the subject.

Thankfully, there have been some thoughtful statements from politicians. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said we seem to be having a "storm of the century" every couple of years.

Good for him! We need to think seriously about what we are doing to our planet. We human beings can destroy our environment or we can choose to stop the destruction, but we need the leadership of our elected officials — and we need to let ourselves be guided by science, not the climate change deniers.

Jeannette Ollodart Marx, Towson

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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