Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Don't blame teachers for murders

Regarding your recent editorial, "How to end the killing" (July 9), your last paragraph made me want to vomit. "No doubt, Baltimore needs effective police and prosecutors, ample drug treatment, better schools, and more economic opportunities." How dare you accuse, through implication or otherwise, that the need for "better schools" is a reason there is so much killing.

Had you defined the loosely-used term, "better schools," perhaps I and probably others may not have been so nauseated. I have taught in the Baltimore public school system for the past two decades. What we need is better students. We have many excellent teachers. I cannot count the number of students who have physically destroyed property in the schools. They have trashed brand new computers, destroyed exit signs, set multiple fires, destroyed many, many lockers, stolen teachers' school supplies, written their filth on the tops of classroom desks, defecated in bathrooms and stairwells, assaulted teachers (beyond constantly telling them to perform certain impossible acts upon themselves) and refused to do any homework or classwork. Need I go any further?

I won't even bother addressing the other "causes" you listed. Too inane.

In summary, the problem seems to be a total disregard for life that exists not only in our crime ridden city, but also in all of the major cities throughout the United States. So, go blame other root causes, but please leave our city police, prosecutors and teachers out of the finger wagging.

Dave Miceli

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • How to save black men

    How to save black men

    Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's State of the City address sounded the alarm again for a "call to action" initiative that would "recruit black men committed to making a difference in the lives of our children to serve as mentors, volunteers, tutors, job training coaches, speakers and more" and...

  • Do Baltimore police need empathy boot camp?

    Do Baltimore police need empathy boot camp?

    In Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby's telling of the fatal arrest of Freddie Gray, one thing in particular stands out: the complete lack of empathy and compassion allegedly shown Gray by any of the six officers charged in his death, including one woman who was specifically sent to check...

  • Batts is not the problem

    Batts is not the problem

    I like Police Commissioner Anthony Batts. I like what he says about Baltimore and I like what he says about policing. He has not been anywhere near as successful implementing his style on the Baltimore City Police Department as we might have wished. The big question is what to do about it ("Batts...

  • Cameras on cops

    Cameras on cops

    There was no small irony in Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's veto Monday of a City Council bill that would have required city police to be equipped with body cameras. For one thing, the mayor herself has said she supports the idea of officers wearing the devices to record their interactions...

  • Baltimore's violent spring

    Baltimore's violent spring

    I watch with incredulity as my Baltimore teeters. Major crises have seemed to grow exponentially these past few weeks. Politicians and people of law enforcement are buckling at the knee. With few exceptions, they seem helpless, at times hapless.

  • Meanwhile, Baltimore's murders continue…

    Meanwhile, Baltimore's murders continue…

    There have been 10 murders in Baltimore City in the span of the last week. Count them, 10 murders ("Man stabbed to death outside Health Care for the Homeless," May 4). Homicide is a malicious, unstoppable beast in our city. While the mayor and police commissioner attempted to keep the city from...

  • Spate of shootings deserves protest

    Spate of shootings deserves protest

    Where are the protesters and politicians now ("Deadly month sees 35 killings," May 26)?

  • Can Batts get the job done?

    Can Batts get the job done?

    Police Commissioner Anthony Batts says violence is out of control in the Western District in part because his officers find themselves surrounded by people with video cameras every time they show up to do even the most routine police work. To give him some credit for his first significant public...

Comments
Loading

55°