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News Opinion Readers Respond

Police need outreach, not shake-up

In the midst of a horrific summer with incomprehensible amounts of bloodshed, the Baltimore City Police Department is doing some internal shuffling ("Batts shakes up police top ranks," July 10). If these moves are meant to appease the citizens of Baltimore, let me be the first to say it is not going to solve the bloodletting.

For years, I have proposed that the city police halve the number of patrol cars and infuse the streets with highly visible police officers. Provide those officers who formerly had patrol cars with bikes, perhaps horses, and lots of walking shoes.

The problem is that many communities harbor an inherent mistrust of the police who patrol their neighborhoods and communities. It is incumbent that the police tear down the walls that exist between them and the citizens they serve and protect.

What Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts needs to do is to establish grass-roots police relationships, where they have an opportunity to establish communications with those whom they serve.

The citizens and police can indeed solve many issues that plague Baltimore by opening up, and establishing lines of communication.

Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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