While it may not be in the interest of Baltimore City public school students that the school board will no longer guarantee loans for public charter school renovations, the larger question is whether city will use its $1.1 billion capital improvement fund to provide facilities for more children to attend high-performing public charter and traditional public schools ("City's charter schools call new policy 'discouraging,'" Oct. 25).

In other words, the best way for the school board to use the money is to increase the number of children attending programs that are already leading students to achieve at high levels.

Jason Botel

The writer is executive director of the school reform advocacy group MarylandCan.