Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
NewsOpinionReaders Respond

Baltimore hiring bill a path to ruin

I lived in a close suburb of Detroit from mid-1970 through April of 2001. During that period of time, I watched Detroit go from a city ranked fifth nationally in population to one that is now only a shell of city and is essentially bankrupt. During the 1970s and 1980s, Mayor Coleman Young tried to institute policies that failed miserably and added to the downward spiral. They included hiring policies that dictated to companies how to do business in the city that only resulted in higher costs to all involved ("Good intentions don't create jobs," May 22).

Rules such as requiring contractors to hire city residents — a proposal currently under review by the Baltimore City Council — only result in an adversarial relationship with the private sector, thus making Baltimore a bad place to do business. One needs certain skill sets to do the work, not just a home address.

It's also a rule that alienates the suburbs from the city and promotes a "we-they" attitude. And it expands the role of big government. When the government is not performing its job now, how can it be expected to take on more policing of another rule?

History forgotten is history repeated.

Chuck Trenkle

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • City hiring bill is needed
    City hiring bill is needed

    It's very tempting to address each point of The Sun's editorial that suggests Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake reject the local hiring bill ("Noble but flawed idea," May 15). But to do so would miss the larger and more important point that lies at the root of the bill's...

  • Forget ID, make voters pass a quiz
    Forget ID, make voters pass a quiz

    Rather than voter identification, I propose a civics test be given when entering the voting booth ("Messing with voting rights in Texas," Oct. 20). If you don't answer four out of five questions correctly, the voting machine is turned off.

  • Transit crime is overstated
    Transit crime is overstated

    A recent headline in The Sun, "Juveniles driving crime on Baltimore transit systems despite intervention efforts" (Oct. 17), implies that crime is going up and that intervention efforts are failing. Yet the facts in that same article say that violent and property crimes fell 67...

  • Act of terrorism ignored
    Act of terrorism ignored

    It is deplorable that The Sun, which was so out front depicting the casualties and damage this summer in Gaza during the war started by Hamas, decided to bury news of the murder of a Jewish baby (and American citizen) by a Palestinian terrorist in Jerusalem at the bottom of Page 8 ("Baby...

  • Treason is treason
    Treason is treason

    There is only one word to describe the behavior of an American citizen who provides "aid and comfort" to the enemy — it's treason ("Girls' alleged attempt to go to Syria worries some," Oct. 23). I've no idea what the federal statutes are today, but in...

  • On guns, Hogan must have something to hide
    On guns, Hogan must have something to hide

    It doesn't take much to recognize that a politician who refuses to release his answers to a questionnaire from an organization that lobbies the legislature may be suspected of having something to hide ("What did Hogan tell the NRA?" Oct. 21).

Comments
Loading