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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Bennett Place a feel-good stunt

Who is Baltimore's police commissioner trying to fool by blocking off the 900 block of Bennett Place ("Fears of violence strain one blood-stained block," July 8)?

The problem with violence in this area is the residents' refusal to let the police know who is causing trouble in their neighborhood. The police are there to help, not provide private security at taxpayer expense.

This accompanying photo of a police officer standing guard is nothing but a feel-good moment to save the commissioner's job. Police don't need to be stationed in 90-degree-plus heat to guard a neighborhood. The police need to get out of their cars an enforce the law. Clear the corners of drug dealers and be a general pain in the butt to them.

Maybe before Commissioner Anthony W. Batts decides to place more police officers guarding neighborhoods, he should sit down and watch all five seasons of "The Wire." Then he will know exactly what the problem is.

J. Michael Collins, Reisterstown

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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