Get unlimited digital access to baltimoresun.com. $0.99 for 4 weeks.
News Opinion Readers Respond

Chow's travels benefit city water system

There have been at least two articles recently in The Sun that referred to the active speaking and conference schedule of Rudy Chow, the operations director of Baltimore's water and wastewater utilities ("Extensive travels of city water chief outlined in documents Sept. 10). Mr. Chow has a solidly-established and well-earned reputation as a strong manager and a good engineer. The articles in The Sun (of which I am a reader for the past 50 years) suggest or infer that somehow or other Mr. Chow is negligent in meeting his duties or is junketing at customers' expense. Neither could be further from the truth, and his reputation is being unfairly sullied. Such insinuations are not worthy of The Sun.

Baltimore's water and sewer systems, which should be one of the crown jewels of the city, are in need of several billion dollars of upgrading and repairs. They are required to meet the increased regulatory standards that have been adopted to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay and to offset a half-century of deferred maintenance by a succession of negligent city administrations. I earn my living as a management consultant providing financial planning and management advice to water and wastewater utilities; I should make it very clear that I do not now and have not ever worked in such a capacity for the City of Baltimore.

Other municipal water and sewer systems would be well-served to have leaders who invest as much time in participating in industry conferences, which are chock-full of morning-to-evening technical sessions where participants learn much and concurrently meet continuing professional education requirements, and in speaking engagements that spread the word about the necessity of reinvesting in maintenance of infrastructure, which is the best way to keep water and sewer rates low over time. Frankly, it would be desirable and beneficial for elected officials who are the stewards of our infrastructure to participate in those same conferences and seminars as does Mr. Chow. If that had happened over the past decades, it is likely that Baltimore would not be facing the horrendous expenses now looming.

Edward J. Donahue III, Annapolis

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Extensive travels of city water chief outlined in documents

    Rudy Chow has spent 35 days in the past year attending conferences

  • Rockfish poaching: Seize boats, not licenses
    Rockfish poaching: Seize boats, not licenses

    If the state thinks that revoking a commercial fishing license from someone who poaches will stop them, the state is wrong ("Waterman could lose license for poaching," Feb. 25). Revoking the license of a commercial fishermen who poach would not stop them. Anyone who does things like that...

  • Don't make light of 'suicide watch'
    Don't make light of 'suicide watch'

    First and foremost, let me say that I am a Baltimore Ravens fan win, lose or tie and will be to the day I die. But owner Steve Bisciotti's recent comment, "I am off suicide watch, I am stable mentally," goes beyond the pale ("Despite 'worst year as an owner,' Bisciotti happy with team's...

  • Hogan's game of divide and conquer
    Hogan's game of divide and conquer

    The daily interchange of letters from veterans, retired teachers and others regarding the merits or flaws in Gov. Larry Hogan's proposal to make veteran's pensions tax exempt reveals what I believe the governor really wanted ("Veterans aren't getting undue benefits," Feb. 25).

  • Sun claims to support equal rights for women, yet disses women's basketball
    Sun claims to support equal rights for women, yet disses women's basketball

    I guess you should be congratulated for your editorial, "Now a word about wage gap" (Feb. 24) in which you support equality of wages for women. However, this paper has contributed to the "inequality" of women in sports by ignoring the success of the Maryland Lady Terps and by giving the men's...

  • Fracking's risks extend beyond Western Md.
    Fracking's risks extend beyond Western Md.

    Maryland's legislature passed an impervious surface tax, better known as the rain tax, in 2012. Maryland is the only state that taxes rainwater (pollution run-off), which sounds like they are "stewards of the environment" and have great concern for the streams and rivers flowing into the...

Comments
Loading