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News Opinion Readers Respond

Sorry, Dr. Carson, but Obamacare is not like slavery

Dr. Ben Carson was revered during his brilliant career as a pediatric neurosurgeon. No doubt he is still a fine, compassionate and well-intentioned person, but his tendency to express his political opinions in hyperbolic comparisons seriously damages his credibility ("Ben Carson says Obamacare 'worst thing' in nation 'since slavery,'" Oct. 11).

I believe it is wrong to compare Obamacare to slavery. Any comparison to the horror of slavery places the presenter on very thin ice. So I will give this as an example of comparison made without any hyperbole intended: Low minimum wages, exorbitant interest rates on credit cards, low interest rates on savings accounts, a tax structure designed to benefit our wealthiest individuals and corporations, and the high cost of higher education — all contribute to the deteriorating quality of life experienced by way too many Americans. This might be called economic slavery.

The evidence is increasing that greed is very, very bad.

Holly Narowanskie, Glen Arm

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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