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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Baltimore's good-hearted nature is showing

There was an interesting article in The Sun indicating that Baltimore City is gaining residents despite its myriad problems while Carroll County is losing them ("Hard times alter area population patterns," March 24). So much so that the county's new public high school Manchester Valley is only 60 percent full of students.

It should be pointed out that Carroll County government has been extremely hostile to immigrants. The Carroll County commissioners, whose sense of Christian duty apparently involves treating immigrants brutally, were certainly not the only county government that lined up against the Maryland Dream Act. Nor were they the only county government that has promulgated a useless English-only bill. But this should be contrasted with the wise and gracious policies of Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake who has embraced immigrants as a way to achieve her goal of 10,000 new families in the city.

It is not often that any politician does something that is gracious as well as wise. As a city resident and Christian, I wholeheartedly concur with her policy and embrace the immigrant communities who find mean spirited nativism in the more cynical and backward suburban counties.

Paul R. Schlitz Jr., Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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