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News Opinion Readers Respond

Carbon tax is the answer [Letter]

In response to the editorial, "Climate change's day in court" (Feb. 26), it does seem that court cases on climate change result in very slow actions. After all, it has been almost seven years since the ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA stating that EPA has the right to regulate carbon dioxide emissions under the Clean Air Act, yet we have continued to have business as usual.

Let's forget about the courts and instead use the free market to tackle carbon dioxide emissions by implementing a carbon fee. The fee can be placed on all products sold in this country and begin as low as $15 per ton of carbon dioxide emitted. The money collected can be distributed back to American households to offset the increase in prices. This will minimize economic discomfort to the poor and middle class while encouraging the free market to find cleaner energy sources to use.

Implementing a carbon fee should also be advocated by the "contingent on the right that assumes any problem whose remedy involves an expanded role for government is to be avoided" since we will not be expanding the role of government with a carbon fee. In fact, we will be minimizing the role of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by using a carbon fee. After all, burning less carbon also results in less emissions of nitrogen oxides (and also sulfur oxides and mercury in the case of coal), all pollutants that EPA has been regulating. Now, EPA will have less to regulate and we can let the free market find healthier ways for us to live in the 21st century.

Sabrina S. Fu, Ellicott City

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Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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